Accrington Web
   

Home Gallery Arcade Blogs Members List Today's Posts
Go Back   Accrington Web > AccyWeb > General Community Talk > Church
Donate! Join Today

Church A place for the people who want to talk about the area of Church.


Welcome to Accrington Web!

We are a discussion forum dedicated to the towns of Accrington, Oswaldtwistle and the surrounding areas, sometimes referred to as Hyndburn! We are a friendly bunch please feel free to browse or read on for more info.
You are currently viewing our site as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, photos, play in the community arcade and use our blog section. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free, so please, join our community today!



Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 25-06-2007, 13:49   #1
God Member
 
Royboy39's Avatar
 

Smog - Sulpher and TCP

Anyone remember these three elements in the air in and around Church?
__________________
Supporting Barcelona 2012/2013

Blackburn Rovers Supporter Since 1950
Royboy39 is offline   Reply With Quote
Accrington Web
Old 26-06-2007, 08:41   #2
God Member
 
MargaretR's Avatar
 

Re: Smog - Sulpher and TCP

I raised this issue in my thread about disguised mobile phone masts -

"A major problem in the 40's and 50's (I lived through it) was air pollution. All the terraced houses (there were far more of them then) burnt coal. There were numerous mill chimneys all belching out smoke too. In winter when everybody needed to heat their homes a short walk outside resulted in soot specks on your face -ladies carried powder compacts to conceal the muck.

On the day after bonfire night you didn't stir out unless you absolutely had to because of thick smog that lasted all day if not longer.In London the smog spells were frequent and notorious for causing deaths. Burnley geographically is in a basin and had the highest rates of suicide because they rarely saw the sun in winter, and a shorter life expectancy due to lung disease (partly due to 'miners lung').

Cigarette smoking was fashionable and accepted because we were not aware that the smoke pollution was damaging.The Smoke Control Act came in the early 60's. Coal was replaced by coke which still gave off fumes but not smoke. Eventually gas and electric fires were used and even later - central heating.

We have now replaced one sort of air pollution with others-
vehicle exhaust fumes (known to be damaging- vehicle ownership was rare in the 40s & 50s) and these high tech microwave and radio emissions ,which we are not sure about ..............YET!!!!."

Nobody responded to it, making it the end of the thread.
I try to explain to my son that the reason for my 'old lady's cough' is more than just fags, but if they didnt live through it they cant conceive how bad the air pollution was.
__________________



MargaretR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-06-2007, 08:51   #3
God Member
 
steeljack's Avatar
 

Re: Smog - Sulpher and TCP

i remember the sulfer smell ,Billy Blythes employed a lot of Poles in the fifties , not sure if they were refugees or not but they allways had a "yellow"cast to their skin ,
steeljack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-06-2007, 08:54   #4
God Member
 
MargaretR's Avatar
 

Re: Smog - Sulpher and TCP

One of the reasons why the mucky air has been forgotten is that by now there are very few stone buildings that havent had the blackness sandblasted off them.
__________________



MargaretR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-06-2007, 09:00   #5
God Member
 
Royboy39's Avatar
 

Re: Smog - Sulpher and TCP

Quote:
Originally Posted by margaret@rothwell5.f View Post
I raised this issue in my thread about disguised mobile phone masts -

"A major problem in the 40's and 50's (I lived through it) was air pollution. All the terraced houses (there were far more of them then) burnt coal. There were numerous mill chimneys all belching out smoke too. In winter when everybody needed to heat their homes a short walk outside resulted in soot specks on your face -ladies carried powder compacts to conceal the muck.

On the day after bonfire night you didn't stir out unless you absolutely had to because of thick smog that lasted all day if not longer.In London the smog spells were frequent and notorious for causing deaths. Burnley geographically is in a basin and had the highest rates of suicide because they rarely saw the sun in winter, and a shorter life expectancy due to lung disease (partly due to 'miners lung').

Cigarette smoking was fashionable and accepted because we were not aware that the smoke pollution was damaging.The Smoke Control Act came in the early 60's. Coal was replaced by coke which still gave off fumes but not smoke. Eventually gas and electric fires were used and even later - central heating.

We have now replaced one sort of air pollution with others-
vehicle exhaust fumes (known to be damaging- vehicle ownership was rare in the 40s & 50s) and these high tech microwave and radio emissions ,which we are not sure about ..............YET!!!!."

Nobody responded to it, making it the end of the thread.
I try to explain to my son that the reason for my 'old lady's cough' is more than just fags, but if they didnt live through it they cant conceive how bad the air pollution was.
Excellent post that Margaret.
I remember walking home from Ossy to Church Kirk having been to the Empire pictures, the air was thick with smog but underneath the smog was a layer of sulpher which was a dirty yellow colour and your found it very difficult to get your breath. This went on for years and I refuse to believe that this did not have an adverse affect on anyone living in the area.
The sulpher fumes came from Blyth's and I dont think they were ever brought to book for this?
Ossy had the smell of TCP to contend with, which sometimes drifted to Church and we also had Steiners dyeworks helping to polute.
__________________
Supporting Barcelona 2012/2013

Blackburn Rovers Supporter Since 1950
Royboy39 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-06-2007, 12:24   #6
Resident Waffler

 
WillowTheWhisp's Avatar
 

Re: Smog - Sulpher and TCP

I used to work in Church and whatever was belching out of Blythes chimney corroded our brass doorkob and knocker. I also remember the smell from the glue factory - boiled bones.
__________________
http://www.accringtonweb.com/forum/signaturepics/sigpic1202_2.gif

WillowTheWhisp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-06-2007, 11:01   #7
☆ V.I.P Member ☆
 
panther's Avatar
 

Re: Smog - Sulpher and TCP

Quote:
Originally Posted by WillowTheWhisp View Post
I used to work in Church and whatever was belching out of Blythes chimney corroded our brass doorkob and knocker. I also remember the smell from the glue factory - boiled bones.
ewww was that ashworths products?
cocker chemicals up nook lane in ossy used to have many chemical spills, thank god its closed now!
__________________
"Dont make someone a priority if your only an option!!"
panther is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27-06-2007, 11:04   #8
God Member
 
Royboy39's Avatar
 

Re: Smog - Sulpher and TCP

Quote:
Originally Posted by panther View Post
ewww was that ashworths products?
cocker chemicals up nook lane in ossy used to have many chemical spills, thank god its closed now!
Yes it was............Cocker Chemicals were responsible for the TCP smell.
__________________
Supporting Barcelona 2012/2013

Blackburn Rovers Supporter Since 1950
Royboy39 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-06-2007, 14:46   #9
Resting in Peace
 
magpie's Avatar
 

Re: Smog - Sulpher and TCP

I remember seeing a blue almost like paint stuff on the walls around there and the houses...

I used to call it Blue Town:
magpie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-06-2007, 10:55   #10
Resident Waffler

 
WillowTheWhisp's Avatar
 

Re: Smog - Sulpher and TCP

What was that from?
__________________
http://www.accringtonweb.com/forum/signaturepics/sigpic1202_2.gif

WillowTheWhisp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-06-2007, 12:57   #11
God Member
 
MargaretR's Avatar
 

Re: Smog - Sulpher and TCP

Quote:
Originally Posted by WillowTheWhisp View Post
What was that from?
My dad worked there for a short time - I recall him saying that they made 'dolly blue' - a fabric whitener used in laundering. It was a small muslin bag tied to a short piece of wood as shown in the bottom left of the postcard shown here -
Dolly Blue-Nostalgic Postcards
__________________




Last edited by MargaretR; 30-06-2007 at 13:00.
MargaretR is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools



Other sites of interest.. More town sites..




All times are GMT. The time now is 06:21.


2003-2013 AccringtonWeb.com


Page generated in 0.32609 seconds with 11 queries

Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1