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Old 15-12-2014, 14:53   #241
spw
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Re: Street Names

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Dobson View Post
Pearl St and Newark St run alongside each other. I have long thought that there may have been a Pearl in the Peel or the Steiner family, but I cannot find one. On the 1891 census, when these two streets first appeared, there were only 54 ladies called Pearl in England - none locally. I am enquiring with Newark Library to see if they know of any connection between the town and these two Accrington industrialists, and if a they can come up with a Pearl who might be connected. In Pearl St at that time was Pearl House, a finer house than the rest of the street. It was occupied by Henry Anderton, a steam engine and boiler maker, who in 1861 was living in Boiler House Works, Lower Antley St This might have been the same house as Pearl House, -- certainly it was nearby. Maybe the house was built on his works. More research needed.
May be relevant. From Lancashire OPC. Perhaps named after the insurance company.
"Baptism: 2 Feb 1888 St James, Church Kirk, Lancashire, England
Pearl Chisham [sic] - [Child] of William Robert Chisham [sic] & Mary Isabella
Born: 15 Dec 1887
Abode: 51 Pearl St. Accrington
Occupation: Pearl-Agent.
Baptised by: J.S. Moffat Curate
Register: Baptisms 1888 - 1900, Page 2, Entry 13"
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Old 15-12-2014, 15:28   #242
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Re: Street Names

Thanks spw. It is possible that it was named after Peels' insurance company. However, there was a Pearl House there before the street was built and named. It was built by Alfred Anderton, boiler maker.in 1870s.
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Old 15-12-2014, 16:25   #243
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Re: Street Names

Did Pearl House become the Spiritualist Church?
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Old 15-12-2014, 16:37   #244
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Re: Street Names

No The spiritualists' church was in middle of a block. From there, I think they went to China St.
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Old 22-01-2015, 16:17   #245
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Re: Street Names

In today's paper4 is an obituary for Rev Jonathan Sidney Peel MC. He was great-great-grandson of Sir Robert Peel, and thus related in some way to Jonathan Peel, who owned much of Accrington in 1800s. Interesting that his middle name is Sidney, so related also to the Sidney Peel after whom Jonathan named our street- and that the name was spelt with an 'i' and not a 'y'. It annoys me each time I drive past the club which likes to call itself Sydney St WMC. ...The Rev Peel was a high-ranking Army officer before going to Cambridge University to study Land Economy. This would doubtless have helped in his management of the land the family still owned in 1960s - and probably still do.
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Old 15-02-2015, 19:58   #246
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Re: Street Names

After some years of research, I learned today that , possibly, even probably, Brown St may be named to honour a William Brown, who married Grace, the daughter of John Hargreaves, a giant in early to mid-Victorian Accrington who owned much of the land in that area of the town. The land was on his 'Priest Heys Estate'. This was name of a house off Willows Lane above Richmond Hill St.
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Old 18-02-2015, 10:43   #247
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Re: Street Names

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Originally Posted by Barrie Yates View Post
Where does Banastre (St) come from?
Found this reference to Banastre when reading this the other day.

Further Sparth, or Sparth House, was purchased from Ralph Rishton by Christopher Cunliffe in 1556, (fn. 80) and by him bequeathed to his son Robert in 1563. (fn. 81) Robert, who died in 1580, likewise bequeathed it to his son Christopher, (fn. 82) and Christopher dying in 1614 was found to hold his messuage in Clayton-le-Moors of Nathaniel Banastre of Altham in socage by 17/8d. rent; his son and heir Robert Cunliffe was eleven years old. (fn. 83) Administration of his estate was granted in 1672 to Elizabeth Cunliffe, his widow. He left sisters and co-heirs. Afterwards it was held by Turnley (1697) and Brooksbank. (fn. 84) Nearer Sparth, or Old Sparth, was acquired in 1669 by a family named Whalley, afterwards of Clerk Hill. (fn. 85) Both Sparths are now included in the Clayton Hall estate. Oakenshaw, another ancient freehold estate, was a century ago the property of Fort, Taylor & Co., calico printers (fn. 86); it now belongs to the trustees of the late Joseph Barnes.

From this website Townships: Clayton-le-Moors | British History Online
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Old 18-02-2015, 10:57   #248
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Found this reference to Banastre when reading this the other day.

Further Sparth, or Sparth House, was purchased from Ralph Rishton by Christopher Cunliffe in 1556, (fn. 80) and by him bequeathed to his son Robert in 1563. (fn. 81) Robert, who died in 1580, likewise bequeathed it to his son Christopher, (fn. 82) and Christopher dying in 1614 was found to hold his messuage in Clayton-le-Moors of Nathaniel Banastre of Altham in socage by 17/8d. rent; his son and heir Robert Cunliffe was eleven years old. (fn. 83) Administration of his estate was granted in 1672 to Elizabeth Cunliffe, his widow. He left sisters and co-heirs. Afterwards it was held by Turnley (1697) and Brooksbank. (fn. 84) Nearer Sparth, or Old Sparth, was acquired in 1669 by a family named Whalley, afterwards of Clerk Hill. (fn. 85) Both Sparths are now included in the Clayton Hall estate. Oakenshaw, another ancient freehold estate, was a century ago the property of Fort, Taylor & Co., calico printers (fn. 86); it now belongs to the trustees of the late Joseph Barnes.

From this website Townships: Clayton-le-Moors | British History Online
Thanks for this. My answer at No 213 is correct in that the family owned land in Altham.
Barnes St, Clayton is named after the Joseph mentioned here. The Accrington one is much more complex. I will come back on that.

Messrs Fort & Taylor, mentioned above, were business partners. Two streets in Acc bear their names, and they lie alongside Moreton St - Taylor lived in Moreton Hall, near Whalley. Fort was MP for Clitheroe and lived at Read.
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Old 13-02-2017, 09:30   #249
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Re: Street Names

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I am very interested in the reasons behind our street names. There is a card index file in the library ( Atarah has done a lot of work on this)

My question now isn't a 'reasons' one, I want to know when Lime Street became Lime Road. It was sometime between 1930 and 1950.
I haven't read the whole thread, and apologies if I'm duplicating information.

Lime Street is mentioned in the 1939 Register. I know it's the same as Lime Road because my grandparents lived at No 9.
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Bury Brothers, Glen Wold, Albert Brown, Rileys Chemicals and Colours
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Old 13-02-2017, 09:40   #250
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Napoleon Street

I'm not sure if I mentioned this before, but between 1891 and 1901 Whalley Road was extended to include Napoleon Street.

I've documented the changes here

https://www.flickr.com/photos/rtbcom...57624817490939

Scroll down a few pages
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Old 13-02-2017, 09:50   #251
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Re: Street Names

I've not been spending much time researching street names in the past year, but it is timely to record that two new Accrington streets have been named after Ron Hill, the Accrington-born and bred long distance runner AND his wife May Hill. I am not aware of a previous example of streets being named after a man and his wife
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Old 26-10-2017, 09:52   #252
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Re: Street Names

Recently two new streets have been created in Acc - Barrett St and Sidings Way. They replace Poland St and Porter St. Barrett St honours Marian Barrett who died in 2012 and was a councillor from 1979 to 89. Sidings Way records that the street runs up to the railway lines , where formerly there was a sidings when we had our own engine sheds and goods yard
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Old 29-01-2018, 16:55   #253
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Re: Street Names

In 1901, the Corporation agreed to a suggestion from the Independent Order of Oddfellows that Crow St, Bash, should be re-named Edward St. Edward would soon become King Edward. I'd like to know a) why was it called Cow St ? and b) why would the Oddfellows make this suggestion - and did they make other such suggestions ?

Is there still an Oddfellows branch in Acc ?

A guess - maybe there were trees containing crows' nests on the land when the street was first paid down in mid-century.
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Old 14-05-2018, 17:01   #254
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Re: Street Names

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Dobson View Post
Pearl St and Newark St run alongside each other. I have long thought that there may have been a Pearl in the Peel or the Steiner family, but I cannot find one. On the 1891 census, when these two streets first appeared, there were only 54 ladies called Pearl in England - none locally. I am enquiring with Newark Library to see if they know of any connection between the town and these two Accrington industrialists, and if a they can come up with a Pearl who might be connected. In Pearl St at that time was Pearl House, a finer house than the rest of the street. It was occupied by Henry Anderton, a steam engine and boiler maker, who in 1861 was living in Boiler House Works, Lower Antley St This might have been the same house as Pearl House, -- certainly it was nearby. Maybe the house was built on his works. More research needed.
Been reading through old threads on a quiet afternoon. As Persia street etc related to countries that Steiners traded with, Newark street may refer to Newark in New Jersey. The city grew very quickly in the 19 century as manufacturing developed and there was a textile industry in the city at that time.
Mark
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Old 14-05-2018, 17:40   #255
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Re: Street Names

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Dobson View Post
In 1901, the Corporation agreed to a suggestion from the Independent Order of Oddfellows that Crow St, Bash, should be re-named Edward St. Edward would soon become King Edward. I'd like to know a) why was it called Cow St ? and b) why would the Oddfellows make this suggestion - and did they make other such suggestions ?

Is there still an Oddfellows branch in Acc ?

A guess - maybe there were trees containing crows' nests on the land when the street was first paid down in mid-century.
Pretty sure there was an "Oddfellows Arms" on the corner of little B'burn Rd and Bank St when I was younger:-)
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