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Old 01-10-2012, 08:48   #706
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Re: Old local expressions

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Originally Posted by cashman View Post
Agree 100% wi Retlaw, whoever wrote the dialect dictionary was probably a southerner.Jaysay can't understand being a tory n us being plebs retlaw.
Just glad ya know your place cashy
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Old 01-10-2012, 19:39   #707
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Re: Old local expressions

Does anyone el use the term 'slaking' to indicate that an underskirt is showing below the hem of a dress/skirt? I think I've got the word right, but am ready to be corrected.
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Old 01-10-2012, 21:18   #708
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Re: Old local expressions

I thought "slaking" meant wetting something through or slaking your thirst?
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Old 01-10-2012, 21:26   #709
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Re: Old local expressions

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I thought "slaking" meant wetting something through or slaking your thirst?
That too, Dave, definitely that too.
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Old 01-10-2012, 21:30   #710
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Re: Old local expressions

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Originally Posted by egg&chips View Post
Does anyone el use the term 'slaking' to indicate that an underskirt is showing below the hem of a dress/skirt? I think I've got the word right, but am ready to be corrected.
The term which means 'slip showing' is slated, not slaked.
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Old 01-10-2012, 21:33   #711
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Re: Old local expressions

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Does anyone el use the term 'slaking' to indicate that an underskirt is showing below the hem of a dress/skirt? I think I've got the word right, but am ready to be corrected.
wrong thread
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Old 01-10-2012, 21:37   #712
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Re: Old local expressions

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Originally Posted by walkinman221 View Post
I thought "slaking" meant wetting something through or slaking your thirst?
You used to be able to buy slaked lime at one time, at a place up Whalley Rd, on the right just before the railway bridge, it were used for whitewash.
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Old 01-10-2012, 22:06   #713
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Re: Old local expressions

You can still buy it at the builders merchants Walter, its commonly known as hydrated lime, used to help prevent shrinkage and crazing in cement render, and an ingredient in some plaster finishes. It also acts as a plasticiser in mortars to make them more workable.
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Old 01-10-2012, 22:24   #714
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Re: Old local expressions

I know that nowadays underskirts/slips are rarely worn, but in my youth they were daily apparel.

Having your slip showing was to appear immodest, so your friend would advise you using obscure terms such as 'your're slated' or even 'Charlie's dead'.
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Old 01-10-2012, 22:46   #715
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Re: Old local expressions

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I know that nowadays underskirts/slips are rarely worn, but in my youth they were daily apparel.

Having your slip showing was to appear immodest, so your friend would advise you using obscure terms such as 'your're slated' or even 'Charlie's dead'.
We used to say "it's snowing" if a lacy edging appeared below someone's skirt. Or Charlie's dead, yes that too, had forgotten.
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Old 02-10-2012, 09:04   #716
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Re: Old local expressions

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We used to say "it's snowing" if a lacy edging appeared below someone's skirt. Or Charlie's dead, yes that too, had forgotten.
Us lads were it did more to the point susie "hoy thi slips showing"
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Old 11-05-2020, 15:46   #717
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Re: Old local expressions

I`ve heard it referred to in reference to Spanish bullfighting.
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Old 12-05-2020, 01:07   #718
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Re: Old local expressions

My Auntie used to use caughtning (no idea how to spell it) to mean a baby that was about to be sick, she is from Accrington.

May Dad often used the phrase a 'Jockey for a pig dealer' - meaning someone was bow legged and Ganzey to describe a jumper or cardigan - my Dad was born in Southport....
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Old 12-05-2020, 07:55   #719
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Re: Old local expressions

My mother used to use caughtning if you thought you were going to be sick but managed to swallow it back down. I don't know how to spell it either.
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Old 12-05-2020, 08:26   #720
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Re: Old local expressions

I know of all those phrases......and a apron was a 'brat'......unless it was frill, then it was a pinny.
My grandparents had very well developed lancashire dialects.....it was like listening to another language to the uninitiated, but it was also rib ticklingly funny.

They used to say of someone who was having a shot gun wedding.....he'd had a bite o th'apple before he'd bowt (bought) the tree'......or he'd been playing hide the sausage.
I was not supposed to know what these things meant, but.....I did.
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